Implementing CHAT

Yes, it is good to have the CHAT to guide an investigation of a community of learners, but like any tool, the CHAT needs to be used in specific ways in a given context. In deed professional learning about how to use the CHAT will involve learners gaining new knowledge, attitudes, skills, aspirations and behaviors (KASAB) just as they might expect to do for any other form of professional development (Easton, 2008).  The nature of CHAT training will vary from one learning community to the next because the needs of learning community are determined by the collective knowledge, skills and experience of it’s members. The remainder of this page presents sections about instrumental genesis, instrumental orchestration and utilization schemes.  These sections briefly describe how learners gain the capacity to improve their community capacity to generate knowledge through the development and implementation of a community CHAT scheme. 

Instrumental Genesis

The process of learning the technological and the procedural use the CHAT tool may be explained by the concept of instrumental genesis (Drijvers, Doorman, Boon, & van Gisbergen, 2009). Instrumental genesis is then the way by which learners gain the skills, attitudes, knowledge, aspirations and behaviours  they need to be able to use the CHAT.  Learners may be taught by an instructor or professional development provider how to use their CHAT tool in a process called instrumental orchestration.  The culmination of instrumental orchestration and group self-learning will be a CHAT utilization schema - a set of protocols that describe how the tool is to be used in a specific context.   

Instrumental Orchestration

It is necessary but insufficient to provide learners with the CHAT.  Learners also need to know: 1. How to use the CHAT 2. When and how often to use the CHAT 3. How to respond to CHAT implementation findings

Utilization Scheme

A utilization scheme for using the CHAT can be somewhat generic but the usage protocols adopted by one group are likely to be substantially unique.  This is because learners in a group will bring with them a unique set of skills and knowledge that will influence the design of a CHAT utilization scheme.  A learning community that is new to collaborative learning practices may benefit from frequent CHAT assessment of their communities learning capacity, while a team made up of learners that have collaborative learning experience and know each other well may focus on only a few of the six  dimensions of the CHAT tool and may use the tool less frequently than beginners might.   

References

Drijvers, P., Doorman, M., Boon, P., & van Gisbergen, S. (2009). Instrumental orchestration: theory and practice. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the sixth congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education. Easton, L. B. (2008). From Professional Development to Professional Learning: If Schools Are to Change to Meet Their Increasingly Urgent Needs, Ms. Easton Argues, Teachers Will Have to Move from Being Trained or Developed to Becoming Active Learners. Significant Change Will Require Educators to Alter Their Attitudes and Behaviors. Phi Delta Kappan, 89(10), 755.

CHAT Implementation

© Michael Moroney 2017
COLiE Collaborative Online  Learning in Education

Implementing CHAT

Yes, it is good to have the CHAT to guide an investigation of a community of learners, but like any tool, the CHAT needs to be used in specific ways in a given context. In deed professional learning about how to use the CHAT will involve learners gaining new knowledge, attitudes, skills, aspirations and behaviors (KASAB) just as they might expect to do for any other form of professional development (Easton, 2008).  The nature of CHAT training will vary from one learning community to the next because the needs of learning community are determined by the collective knowledge, skills and experience of it’s members. The remainder of this page presents sections about instrumental genesis, instrumental orchestration and utilization schemes.  These sections briefly describe how learners gain the capacity to improve their community capacity to generate knowledge through the development and implementation of a community CHAT scheme. 

Instrumental Genesis

The process of learning the technological and the procedural use the CHAT tool may be explained by the concept of instrumental genesis (Drijvers, Doorman, Boon, & van Gisbergen, 2009). Instrumental genesis is then the way by which learners gain the skills, attitudes, knowledge, aspirations and behaviours  they need to be able to use the CHAT.  Learners may be taught by an instructor or professional development provider how to use their CHAT tool in a process called instrumental orchestration.  The culmination of instrumental orchestration and group self-learning will be a CHAT utilization schema - a set of protocols that describe how the tool is to be used in a specific context.   

Instrumental Orchestration

It is necessary but insufficient to provide learners with the CHAT.  Learners also need to know: 1. How to use the CHAT 2. When and how often to use the CHAT 3. How to respond to CHAT implementation findings

Utilization Scheme

A utilization scheme for using the CHAT can be somewhat generic but the usage protocols adopted by one group are likely to be substantially unique.  This is because learners in a group will bring with them a unique set of skills and knowledge that will influence the design of a CHAT utilization scheme.  A learning community that is new to collaborative learning practices may benefit from frequent CHAT assessment of their communities learning capacity, while a team made up of learners that have collaborative learning experience and know each other well may focus on only a few of the six  dimensions of the CHAT tool and may use the tool less frequently than beginners might.   

References

Drijvers, P., Doorman, M., Boon, P., & van Gisbergen, S. (2009). Instrumental orchestration: theory and practice. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the sixth congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education. Easton, L. B. (2008). From Professional Development to Professional Learning: If Schools Are to Change to Meet Their Increasingly Urgent Needs, Ms. Easton Argues, Teachers Will Have to Move from Being Trained or Developed to Becoming Active Learners. Significant Change Will Require Educators to Alter Their Attitudes and Behaviors. Phi Delta Kappan, 89(10), 755.
COLiE Collaborative On-line Learning in Education